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WELCOME TO THE JAMES FAMILY

Posted on 13th October, 2017

WELCOME TO THE JAMES FAMILY

 

 

Lorna, Andrew, Emily and Isabel have moved into Ridgely, Charlton Lane. They have moved from Loose as their growing family needed more room.

Andrew is a builder and is busy tidying up and decorating their new home. Lorna was a helpdesk technician for an engineering company, but is now a full time mum, enjoying looking after her children. Their family lives close by.

Emily is 5 and attends Loose Primary School. Isabel is just 1 and Lorna is hoping to take her along to Little Angels in the church.

 

Lorna and Andrew are interested to get to know more people in the village and join in village life. Andrew has expressed an interest in playing cricket-I’m sure the Sports Club will be pleased to hear from him! He also has an interest in collecting Militaria. Lorna is artistic and creative.

We hope they enjoy living in West Farleigh and that they will be made welcome.

 

Interestingly we now have 3 James families within 100yds of each other in Charlton Lane. Not related as far as we know!

WELCOME TO THE WILSON FAMILY

Posted on 26th July, 2017

          Welome to Chris and Megan Wilson

   

    

 

 

 

   The Wilson family have moved into the top house in St Helen's Lane. They have moved from Gravesend as they wanted a more rural setting with easy access to dog walking areas. They have two longhaired German Shepherds and a labrador.

They are enjoyingin being woken up by the birds and walking their dogs along the river. hris is an engineer working for CocaCola at Sidcup and Megan works for Medway Council looking after carparks and parking enforcement. 

Their son Sam is a kayaker and does the sport competitively, havong learnt to paddle in the Scouts. Kitty is a keen dancer and helps out at childrens dance classes. She works at Otford Boarding Kennels.

 

Chris and Megan are keen to be integrated into the village. Megan already sings with the Farleighs' Choir. Chris played cricket for the village. Lets make them welcome.

 

Edward Burkhart Chevalier

Posted on 6th March, 2017

EDWARD BURKART

 

Chevalier d’ Ordre de la Legion d’Honneur

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      Legion d'Honneur medal                  Edward wearing his medals.

                                                     (the order of Orange Nassau is on the right)

 

To celebrate the 70th anniversary of the D Day landings, the French Government decided to award the Legion d'Honneur to all soldiers still living who participated in the landings.

 

Edward volunteered for the army on leaving school, he went to the Army Cadet training

camp near Trottisclife and also trained at Barmouth North Wales.

 

As a lieutenant he embarked from Portsmouth for the D Day landings in 1944. He was driving a Jeep and was first off the landing craft. The beach was difficult to negotiate due to large concrete barriers. Edward decided it would be easier to turn the Jeep round and reverse up the beach.

 

They set off on the prescribed road and stopped by a sheltering hedge and had a picnic. A rather surreal thing to do, but troops need to eat! The road was littered with debris including telegraph poles and wires, the latter getting entangled round the wheels and immobilising the vehicle. Fortunately they came across some soldiers with wire cutters, but in his enthusiasm to release the Jeep, he cut through the brake pipes!

 

At the end of the war Edward was awarded Knight of the Order of Orange Nassau medal, along with campaign medals, one of which has a leaf to denote, “Mentioned in Despatches”.

 

Edward, now aged 92, was not fit enough to attend a presentation ceremony by the French Ambassador, so his medal was posted to him.

 

Michael Devenish

Posted on 16th December, 2016

Michael Sean English Devenish

1943-2016

 

 

Michael lived at Fox Pitt all his life, with interludes for education, London and Hong Kong. He was educated at Cheam Prep School and then at Uppingham. It was there his love of music was awakened, when he was introduced to Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring.

He went on to Magdelene College Cambridge, to study to be a vet, but changed to read English. His love of the arts was nurtured here and he was steered towards publishing.

Michael had a great love of the country side, and its sports. He loved rough shooting, nothing organised. He loved to ski and went annually to Switzerland where an aunt and uncle had a hotel.

After Cambridge he went to London to join Oxford University Press and was soon sent to Hong Kong, where he learnt to sail. On his return he edited the Oxford companion to Ships and the Sea, of which he was very proud. He also met Belinda at the Press amateur dramatic group. They were both in the Begger’s Opera.

As OUP was moving to Oxford and wanting improve his prospects, he signed on at the International Business school in Fontainbleu in order to study for his MBA. While there he enjoyed riding in the Foret de Fontainbleu. On his return he got a good job with Citibank.

He was introduced to sailing, when he moved to London, by one of his housemates. He sailed closer to the wind than his friends were comfortable with! He enjoyed a bit of danger.

He moved on to Ocean Racing with an old Cambridge friend. Racing gave him an excuse to be even more daring.

After a short spell at Citibank, he moved to Mitchell Beasley and then to Collins, where Belinda was working.

Michael and Belinda married in February 1979 and had a flat in Sunningdale Gardens Kensington. Lucy and Harry were born there but in 1985 with two small children they made the momentous move to Fox Pitt. They then proceeded to turn the reduced farm into a viable proposition, converting the out buildings, mostly pig sties into units for small businesses. This is still a flourishing enterprise.

While Michael was commuting to London to Collins, Belinda was running the business and bringing up the children.

In 1990 Michael Joined Dorling Kindersley to a job that suited him perfectly. Ending up as Managing Director, Dorling Kindersley International. While travelling abroad, he enjoyed entertaining clients in excellent Restaurants and enjoying fine wine.

Food and drink seemed to have played a large part of his social life, growing his own veg and eating the game he had shot as well as entertaining royally.

The village will miss his presence in the village, especially the very strong cider he produced on festive village occasions!

Our good wishes go to Belinda and her family.

Michael Sean English Devenish

1943-2016

 

Michael lived at Fox Pitt all his life, with interludes for education, London and Hong Kong. He was educated at Cheam Prep School and then at Uppingham. It was there his love of music was awakened, when he was introduced to Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring.

He went on to Magdelene College Cambridge, to study to be a vet, but changed to read English. His love of the arts was nurtured here and he was steered towards publishing.

Michael had a great love of the country side, and its sports. He loved rough shooting, nothing organised. He loved to ski and went annually to Switzerland where an aunt and uncle had a hotel.

After Cambridge he went to London to join Oxford University Press and was soon sent to Hong Kong, where he learnt to sail. On his return he edited the Oxford companion to Ships and the Sea, of which he was very proud. He also met Belinda at the Press amateur dramatic group. They were both in the Begger’s Opera.

As OUP was moving to Oxford and wanting improve his prospects, he signed on at the International Business school in Fontainbleu in order to study for his MBA. While there he enjoyed riding in the Foret de Fontainbleu. On his return he got a good job with Citibank.

He was introduced to sailing, when he moved to London, by one of his housemates. He sailed closer to the wind than his friends were comfortable with! He enjoyed a bit of danger.

He moved on to Ocean Racing with an old Cambridge friend. Racing gave him an excuse to be even more daring.

After a short spell at Citibank, he moved to Mitchell Beasley and then to Collins, where Belinda was working.

Michael and Belinda married in February 1979 and had a flat in Sunningdale Gardens Kensington. Lucy and Harry were born there but in 1985 with two small children they made the momentous move to Fox Pitt. They then proceeded to turn the reduced farm into a viable proposition, converting the out buildings, mostly pig sties into units for small businesses. This is still a flourishing enterprise.

While Michael was commuting to London to Collins, Belinda was running the business and bringing up the children.

In 1990 Michael Joined Dorling Kindersley to a job that suited him perfectly. Ending up as Managing Director, Dorling Kindersley International. While travelling abroad, he enjoyed entertaining clients in excellent Restaurants and enjoying fine wine.

Food and drink seemed to have played a large part of his social life, growing his own veg and eating the game he had shot as well as entertaining royally.

The village will miss his presence in the village, especially the very strong cider he produced on festive village occasions!

Our good wishes go to Belinda and her family.

WELCOME TO OUR VILLAGE

Posted on 4th August, 2016

 

 

 

Sam and Sarah Saunderson have moved into Sundowner,

Charlton Lane, into the house that belonged to Anne and Graeme McNaughton.

Sam previously lived in Loose with his parents and Sarah lived with hers in East Farleigh, so they are not strangers to the area.

They had been looking for a semirural location with easy access to shops etc. Sam’s mum spotted Sundowner and pointed him in its direction. It fitted the bill! They spent several months modernising and changing it to suit their lifestyle and moved into it, in March, following their wedding.

Sam and Sarah have known each other since they were both at Linton Park School. A Plymouth Brethren School.

Sam works in the family business refurbishing washrooms in schools and offices. Sarah keeps busy with charitable work.

We hope that they will be happy in West Farleigh.

 

 

A warm welcome also to Sascha and Tony Theodore who have recently moved into Wyngarth, on the Lower Road. They have moved from Kings Hill and are enjoying the quiet of their new house and garden (apart from the bird scarers in the cherry orchard!). The house had been empty (apart from the spiders) for 2 years when they bought it and they have a lot of work to do but are looking forward to the challenge.

ELLY BERNHERDT

Posted on 2nd March, 2016

Elly Bernherdt

                                                                1949-2016

 

Elly was never keen to have her photo taken, so a picture of wisteria, like that on the front of their cottage, hopefully, will be a reminder of her.

Elly who lived at 2 The Green for many years, was not able to fight her cancer any more and died at the end of January. She is greatly missed by her husband Paul, daughter Gemma, son Toby, the 5 grandchildren and other family and friends.

 

Elly had a Humanist send off at the Crematorium. There was standing room only and it was a very moving ceremony with her favourite music being played. A very brave and articulate friend, they had been friends since starting work together, spoke about Elly in a positive  yet humorous way.

 

Elly loved her garden, and was always happy upside down in a herbaceous border, consequently her send off was surrounded by flowers from her friends and family. Touchingly, those present were offered a small bag of bulbs to plant in her memory.

 

Afternoon tea was served back at the house. The WI ladies had made the cakes and served the tea. Elly was very fond of her tea, taken black!

 

Elly was born and spent her formative years in Southampton, she attended Art School and went on to be a window dresser at Peter Jones in London.

 

Her artistic talents were used to good effect as she made celebration cakes as a living as well as making all her own cards etc. She told me once she had also tried all the seasonal jobs in the village, hop, apple and strawberry picking, which was something she could do when her children were young.

 

On retirement, she used her skills by teaching the WI ladies many different crafts. Elly could see the potential in what we would consider junk. Her garden is very interesting and imaginative. Most of us would have thrown the artefacts, she used to good effect, away as junk. Even the garden sheds were painted up to look like beach huts.

 

Elly looked out for her neighbours and was a helper at Evergreens. No one can make a Lemon Drizzle like Ellies. Light but very lemony.

 

She will leave a hole in village life that will be difficult to fill.

 

If you would like to add your own memories, please use the comment box below, and we will

incorporate them.

Castle Farm, Heath Road

Posted on 17th February, 2016

Rumbles, rumours and gossip abound about what is happening to the Castle Farm land adjacent to Kettle Lane. Will it be a windfarm, a housing development, camping site? What has happened to the Public Footpath

 

I had the pleasure of talking with the landowner, Mr Gilbert junior shortly after the trees in Kettle Lane were 'trimmed' back.  His parents who I am sure you all know (Mr and Mrs Gilbert) are now living in a care home.  The land has been left untended for a number of years so Mr Gilbert is preparing the land for agricultural use which he hopes to rent out in the near future.

 

The trees and hedgerow were in a terrible state and rotting, so they have all been cut back to encourage new growth. 

 

The Publc Footpath is still there and has not not been taken out of service.  But be warned it is very muddy due to the wet weather conditions of late.

 

Jacky Taylor

 

 

DON GOODWIN

Posted on 9th February, 2016

DONALD GOODWIN

 

28th November 1928 - 23rd December 2015

 

 

 

 Don was born in Brentford on November 28th 1928, the firstborn of Frederic and Kathleen Goodwin.

 

The story goes that Don's father (who was a superb footballer) was playing in a match that day: and when the news came through that he had become a father, the crowd burst out cheering.

Don certainly enjoyed recounting this story: he was very proud of his father and always had a great love of football.

Don was a happy boy and by the time he went to primary school the family had moved to Welling in Kent. He enjoyed school life, excelling in English and History. He also had an aptitude for Art. Subsequently he was awarded a scholarship at Dartford Grammar School which was a proud moment for his parents.

 

They hoped he would gain the right qualifications in order to pursue a career in local government.

Don had other ideas however.

 

His grandparents worked on a farm in Oxfordshire and Don loved spending summer holidays there, where he helped as much as he could. This inspired him to reject the calling of county council meetings and try to become a farmer himself. 

So when he left school at 16 (with good O level results) he went to the Kent Farm Institute at Sittingbourne. He had two very happy years there and always spoke fondly of that time. One of his tutors was the father of Yvonne Martin! He learned as much as he could about farming, both practically and theoretically, as well as forming life long friendships.

 

With good references, Don began his career working at a nursery near Chelsfield where he enjoyed cultivating the strawberries in particular. The variety in question was Royal Sovereign.

 

He was still living with his parents in Welling at this time.

His daily commute to work was by motorcycle.

Motorcycling became a lifelong passion for Don – despite a close call which involved sliding underneath a coal lorry in the snow and emerging uninjured !

 

He made new friends with fellow motorcyclists and enjoyed track days at Brands Hatch and a visit to the Isle of Man TT. He became very skilful at motorcycle maintenance and was generally mechanically minded throughout his life.

 

The most important event of Don's life happened in January 1950.

 

At a dance in Bexleyheath he met Patricia Johnson. They fell in love very soon and after a happy year's courtship they married at St Paulinus Church, Crayford in March 1951.

 

Don's parents had bought a smallholding near Okehampton in Devon. Don and Pat moved down there to help. Times were not at all easy for them; en route they had to spend their final £5 on a new tyre for their little Austin car.

They both worked very hard on the farm for two years, working with livestock.

Don found that he missed being a grower and in 1953 they moved to Longread in Barming, which was owned by a Miss Noakes. Here Don and Pat worked growing fruit, vegetables and hops. They enjoyed the company of the other staff there.

 

In 1955 with good references again, Don was able to rent a farm from Kent County Council near East Malling. He decided to call it Hillberry Farm as Hillberry is a famous point on the Isle of Man TT circuit.

Here they grew runner beans, strawberries and raspberries and also kept pigs.

They became very fond of the pigs. In the summer if the pigs got sunburnt they rubbed them with soothing calamine lotion.  After five years they stopped keeping pigs as they felt too much like pets !

 

In 1963 they had saved enough money to buy their own farm just down the road – Luckhurst Farm. 

They had more land at Luckhurst and made the momentous decision to concentrate on strawberries, with some raspberries. They dug a reservoir and invested in irrigation. This is regular practice nowadays but was really innovative in the mid 60s.

He then employed a good team of fruit pickers from East Malling and he bought a second hand luxury coach to ferry them to and fro. He also provided facilities for the pickers' children such as a play area, with a sandpit.

He enjoyed life in East Malling where he worked closely with experts in fruit production at the research station.

And he was very pleased to be a churchwarden at St James' parish church.

 

In 1967 they moved here to Court Lodge Farm where they grew apples, pears, raspberries and strawberries.

 

Again he installed irrigation and added an extra cold store for the apples and pears. He really enjoyed working with his team of full time staff. He needed to buy another coach as the workforce had grown to include pickers from Maidstone and Barming. as well as his loyal East Malling pickers.

 

Nigel thought that Don enjoyed these years the most in his farming career: he was fully involved in all aspects of the farm and there was a real sense of teamwork. The farm was a success –it was an exciting time.

 

He was able to buy extra land at Pelican Farm for strawberry runner production, and in 1978 he purchased a farm in Sussex where he put in 20 acres of strawberries and raspberries.

 

In 1970 he went on a tour of Europe observing farming practices – interested in different or new ideas that he could use, looking to try growing new strawberry varieties.

He was a genuine strawberry enthusiast. 

 

He became a guest speaker at conferences. He was chairman of the Maidstone branch of the NFU.  Then in 1972 he became chairman of the newly formed Kentish Garden group. He was particularly proud to be involved with Kentish Garden. He viewed his fellow growers with affection;  and was both inspired and also reassured by the high standard of fruit production in the group. The Kentish Garden group went on a trip to California in 1973. Don found this trip to be interesting and informative and returned to California on three subsequent occasions with Pat.

 Don was awarded the MBE for services to fruit growing in 1983.

Judging by the letters and phone calls of congratulation this MBE was well received by his peers.

 

Don decided to stop farming in about 1995 –  he had achieved so much and the office and paperwork side of farming was increasing. From 2005 onwards he gradually became a devoted carer for Pat.

 

Don's other great lifelong hobby after motorcycling was classical music – and he really enjoyed practising his Hammond organ whenever he had time. He took lessons and once played for the midnight service at West Farleigh Church.

 

Another aspect to Don was his love of animals. We've already mentioned the pigs – he and Pat had a succession of much loved German Shepherd dogs – five in all. 

 

Don cared about the wildlife on the farm: he worked with experts on owls who installed special owl boxes for barn owls on the farm. He lived in hope of an otter turning up in the specially built holt the wildlife trust built here. And especially in his old age he took daily delight in watching the wild birds on the generously filled bird feeders. And for a few years a fox or two would be waiting every evening for him to come out and feed them their supper. 

 

He was a man who greeted challenges with a cheerful optimism and usually overcame setbacks by not acknowledging them.

 

His characteristic laugh will surely be remembered, by everyone who knew him, with huge affection.

 

Narrative taken from the Eulogy given by his son Nigel at Dons funeral.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memories of Ernest Cheeseman

Posted on 17th August, 2015

We were delighted to hear from Brenda Field (nee Richardson) about her grandfather Ernest Cheeseman, who moved to the village in 1917 and remained here until his death in 1972.

 

Click here for Brenda's reminiscences, or here and here to read his obituary in Lifeline (from which it is clear that Ernest Cheeseman was a loved and revered local figure, 'the father of the village.'  There is an especially poignant tribute from E. Peter Day.

 

Do you have anything to add to this story?  Or do you have other memories life in this village.  Please do get in touch with Jacky Taylor (editor@farleighevents.com or phone 01622 236421)

 

Picture below: Ernest and Susan Cheeseman (far right) at the marriage of their daughter Beryl.

 

 

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Joyce Morgan (1916-2015)

Posted on 1st February, 2015

 

Joyce’s early years were spent in Staplehurst.  She came to West Farleigh in 1936 as a housekeeper.  She married Edward ‘Ted’ Morgan in 1943 and they ran a poultry farm. This was a lady who gave a lifetime’s service to the church and to the village of West Farleigh.  

 

Joyce and Ted Morgan

 

She was always friendly, kind hearted and generous; she was also renowned for her cake making: at any village event Joyce would be running a cake stall (often assisted by her friend, Vera Smith, who lived very near her).  Joyce had two daughters, Liz and Jill, and it was Jill who lived with her mother and looked after her so conscientiously in her last years. 

 

All Saints Church West Farleigh was Joyce’s special love and where she accomplished so much devoted service.  She was Church Warden at All Saints for a substantial period: much of it alongside Peter Day.  She influenced the format of services as well as undertaking considerable work on the fabric of the building.  Joyce was a person with high standards, who always gave of her very best in everything she undertook.

 

For a great many years Joyce was a major organizer of the Annual Harvest Supper, taking a keen interest in the catering, the entertainment and the whole programme.  There were countless West Farleigh village events where Joyce would be playing a major part, so inevitably she was known, and loved, by a great many people over a long period of time.

 

Joyce was a member of the Women’s Institute in Maidstone for many years; and she would sell garden produce and homemade cakes at their Friday Markets: her contribution here was of a particularly practical nature: Joyce was a “doer” rather than a “talker”, and someone who liked to get on with things.  Her special Charity which she supported for much of her life was the RNLI.

 

Joyce, who was widowed in 1983, died on Thursday, 1st January 2015.  She leaves her daughters, Liz and Jill; her grandchildren Claire and Alexander, and great grandchildren, Daniel and Beth.

 

Hugh Grainger

January 2015